lands before time

dinosaur footprints (7 of 10)dinosaur footprints (6 of 10)dinosaur footprints (3 of 10)

I’ve returned from my brief trip through time to the Pleistocene–I mean, my birthday week hiatus! You’d be forgiven, though, if these photos did give you the impression that I’d popped back a few aeons.

I’m still yearning for those lovely mid-June days spent with the dearest companion, but I’m consoling myself by reliving our trip to a local natural history museum. These archaic bones and stone impressions comfort me: at least our time apart will be nothing more than the smallest blip on a geologic scale!

Continue reading

pin review: trilobite by natelle draws stuff

trilobite (4 of 7)trilobite (7 of 7)

Happy Trilobite Friday! At the start of June, I had just been thinking that my pin collection was seriously lacking in representation of Paleozoic ocean life–and then Natelle Draws Stuff released a brass 3D trilobite pin and I became more delighted than I’ve felt in eons.

I’m aware that I am totally setting myself up for strangers telling me “ew, there’s a bug on your collar!”*: but introvert though I may be, I remain incredibly excited to spread the good word of trilobite natural history to anyone who happens to question my accessory choices.

*I mean, it is an arthropod, but it’s a cute one! Come on!

Continue reading

Gallery Quest

clark-11-of-14clark-13-of-14

It’s no secret that I love intense installations and quirky conceptual art–my favorite type of contemporary art is anything that makes me feel like the child protagonist of a fantasy novel, exploring a brave new world that has such colors and forms in it.

This marks my third year that I’ve blogged about my annual trip to the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (MASS MoCA!) and I am so delighted to share some new wonders. I get the sense, sometimes, that many think  art appreciation is a realm of extremes–you either love historic art and think modernism is meretricious and meaningless, or enjoy contemporary art and find old gold frames dull and outdated.

I promise, it’s possible to appreciate both the Renaissance and rooms filled with giant plastic towers (which I saw at Mass MOCA a few years ago)! Actually, taking on the persona of your inner kid-in-a-fantasy novel, forgetting all the biases and preconceptions you might carry into any museum, is a good way to start!

Continue reading

Cambrian Cuties: Science Lessons from 1942

book (5 of 9)book (3 of 9)book (2 of 9)

The only thing better than a well-stocked used book sale is a well-stocked used book sale with a free bin. After buying my fair share of gorgeous volumes at a local like-new literary extravaganza this weekend, I stopped by a table of unwanted scraps and paperbacks, ready to glean to my heart’s content.

It’s appropriate that I had to basically excavate my way through the Burgess Shale of coffee-stained romance novels and old sheet music to find this incredible treasure: a natural history book for kids from 1942. As a girl who loves vintage children’s illustrations as much as she loves Tiktaalik, I am delighted by this rare opportunity to peek back a few decades–and aeons!

Continue reading

Glass Jellies & Giant Ground Sloths: The Harvard Museums

DSC_0969

DSC_0981

Before I launch into this natural history extravaganza, let me deal with some housekeeping matters: thank you for putting up with a day of theme weirdness on Sunday while I completely redesigned Sarr Trek’s look! I think the new aesthetic better captures my own interests and style–plus, it’s super cute. (If you haven’t seen my actual site in a while, you should give it a quick look!)

Anyway, my celebration of our Thanksgiving trip to the Boston & North Shore area continues today: this time with more squid and science! Though I’ve heard much of them, I’d never visited any of Harvard’s museums, so our family adventure was the perfect way to check the Cambridge group off my gallery bucket list. As someone who works at an art museum, I have a soft spot for natural history museums and other institutions that showcase things entirely different from my workplace’s collections. It’s a lot of fun to see how curation and education functions in other fields of study.

Also, I mean, I just really love fossils and stuff, so, you know.

Continue reading